whole grain news

newsroom

Blog

When there's Big News in the Whole Grains Council, we send out a press release and post it in the press release section of this website. But every day, the momentum of whole grains moves forward in many smaller ways, which you can read about here. Come back often, and see what's new, or subscribe with our RSS feed.

RSS Feed - Subscribe to updates on the Whole Grains Council Blog

Got comments on any of our WGC Blog items? We'd love to hear from you.

Q&A with Ann Taylor Pittman, author of Everyday Whole Grains

June 29, 2016

Everyday Whole Grains:175 New Recipes From Amaranth to Wild Rice first graced our desks this March, and we haven’t been able to put it down since. So when we had the chance to catch up with the author, Cooking Light executive food editor Ann Taylor Pittman, we jumped at the opportunity. Our conversation follows below, edited and condensed for clarity.

Also, don’t miss the recipe for Smoked Barley, Beet, and Grapefruit Salad that Ann is kindly sharing with Whole Grains Council blog readers at the end of this article. (Kelly)

Whole Grain Value: Live Longer, with Whole Grains

June 22, 2016

Two new studies hit the news this month, linking whole grains with longer life. 

Between them, the two studies (which we’ve summarized on our Health Studies page here and here) examined data from millions of people in more than four dozen different studies, and found evidence showing those who eat the most whole grains had a slew of reduced risks compared to those eating the least, including:

June Grain of the Month Series: Sorghum

June 15, 2016

Search the term “sorghum” in Google News, and you’ll receive over 60,000 stories featuring our June Grain of the Month. Sorghum has been in the news a lot lately, but it seems it is still one of the lesser known grains.

Five Summer Foods That Taste Better With Whole Grains

June 8, 2016

We love our whole grains and add them to recipes whenever we can. But there are many types of recipes that actually work much better when you swap in some whole grains, and not just in our opinion. Here are a few summer dishes that, when made with whole grains, will rock your world…

1.  Veggie Burgers. Most veggie burgers are made with tofu and/or beans. And though we love the taste of those foods, those veggie burgers tend to be bland and lacking in a “crunch” factor. Try adding ½-1 cup of cooked whole grains, like brown rice or quinoa, to your veggie burgers to see how they change the texture and flavor of your burger for the better.  

Whole Grain Value: 2 to 3 Times More of Most Nutrients

June 1, 2016

Here at Oldways we firmly believe that eating well should be an enjoyable activity, not a math test. That's why we don't talk a lot about getting so many milligrams of this or that in every meal – and why we'd always rather talk about what foods are best to eat, rather than what nutrients. When you fill your plate with an appetizing variety of real, whole foods, the nutrients pretty much take care of themselves.

Once in a while, though, the compulsion overtakes us, and we just have to slip in a little nutrient-speak to remind everyone of why real foods – in this case, whole grains – are the way to go.

Craving Cookies

May 25, 2016

Last week I made a trip to our local Farmer's Market in Copley Square for the first time this season. In addition to the incredible asparagus, abundance of wild mushrooms, and fresh cut flowers to peruse, I was on a mission to treat myself to a bag of my very favorite oatmeal cookies from the Siena Farms/Sofra Bakery stand. However, after browsing the usual selection to no avail, I was sadly informed that they had discontinued that particular cookie.

New Survey Shows Americans are Differentiating Between Whole & Enriched Grains

May 18, 2016

Enriched grain products may flaunt their added nutrients and supposed nutritional superiority, but in a promising sign of consumer food and health literacy, Americans aren’t buying it. In fact, if the much anticipated International Food Information Council (IFIC) Food and Health survey is any indication, it’s whole grain or bust.

Unlike whole grains, which contain all of their original bran, germ, and endosperm, enriched grains are stripped of the nutritious bran and germ, losing 25% of the grain’s protein, and greatly reducing at least 17 key nutrients (including fiber). Only a handful of nutrients are added back into enriched grains, and not in their original proportions. 

Whole Grain Value: 25% More Protein than Refined Grains

May 11, 2016

If you’re trying to eat more protein, you’re not alone. But if the only things that come to mind when you think "protein" are grilled meats and Greek yogurt, a simple swap for boosting your protein intake could be hiding right under your nose: just switch to whole grains! Most grains have about 25% more protein when eaten their whole form; whole wheat flour, for example, has 28% more protein than refined wheat flour.

Here's some food for thought: Of the six foods below, which have the most protein?

May Grain of the Month Series: Amaranth

May 4, 2016

May’s Grain of the Month is a relative newcomer to the U.S. market, but has thousands of years of history behind it. Amaranth is said to have been domesticated by the Aztecs between 6,000 and 8,000 years ago, and played a large part in these ancient peoples’ existence beyond just the dinner plate. Despite its rich history, this “ancient grain” may be new to you.

Whole Grains Are Coming to a Daycare Near You

April 27, 2016

With 98.5% of schools across the US certified as meeting the updated nutrition standards, the movement towards healthier lunches in schools has been one of the greatest achievements in the fight against childhood obesity. Now, building on this success, the USDA announced a new rule last week that will strengthen nutrition requirements for the National Child and Adult Care Food Program (the program that determines what is fed to preschool age children and others in daycare settings).

According to the USDA, “This is the first major revision of the CACFP meal patterns since the program's inception in 1968 and will require meals and snacks provided through the CACFP to better reflect the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the nutritional issues facing young children and adults today.” 


All information on this website is © 2003-2013, Oldways Preservation Trust/Whole Grains Council, unless otherwise noted.