SEARCH HEALTH STUDIES

Digestibility Changes in Sprouted Barley

In an experiment at the University of Alberta, barley kernels were sprouted from 2 to 5 days, then oven-dried and milled. Researchers found decreases in dry matter, gross energy (calories) and triglycerides, and increases in fiber and diglyceride content. After the sprouted barley was fed to rats, scientists said that “digestibility data showed an enhancement of digestibility of nutrients in barley… implying that sprouting improved nutritional qualify of barley.”
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, September 1989; 39(3):267-78.

Nutritional Improvement of Cereals by Sprouting

In a 1989 meta-analysis of existing studies, JK Chavan and SS Kadam found evidence that “Sprouting of grains for a limited period causes increased activities of hydrolytic enzymes, improvement in the contents of certain essential amino acids, total sugars, and B-group vitamins, and a decrease in dry matter, starch, and antinutrients. The digestibilities of storage proteins and starch are improved due to their partial hydrolysis during sprouting.”
Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 1989; 28(5):401-37.

Amaranth’s Protein Is Especially Good For Children

Researchers in Peru fed toasted amaranth flour, popped amaranth grain, and amaranth flakes to young children as the source of all dietary protein and fat, and as 50% of their daily energy requirements.  Later, children were fed a mix of amaranth and corn in various flour, flake, and meal forms.  Results showed that protein uptake from amaranth flour was favorable, and combining amaranth with corn provided for better protein uptake than consuming corn alone.
The Journal of Nutrition, January 1988; 118(1):78-85

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