Upcoming Live Webinars

Understanding Whole Grain Processing and Impacts on Nutrition
Thursday, November 19, 2020 at 3pm ET

Whole grains are an important part of a balanced diet, yet many Americans are still falling short of dietary recommendations for whole grain consumption. In this session, Dr. Caleigh Sawicki from the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, will share updates on the health benefits of whole grains and why whole grains were an especially important part of the report of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Scientific Advisory Committee.  Additionally, Dr. Eric Decker, Professor and Head of the Department of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts, will share research on how various processing methods impact the health of whole grains. The session will close with practical tips on how to help patients and clients meet the dietary recommendations for whole grains. Register here.

Previous Webinars

For Registered Dietitians seeking CPEU credit:

Registered Dietitians can earn 1 CPEU credit per webinar. The video recording of Wheat Sensitivities: Sorting Fact from Fiction can be viewed for CPEU credit until April 14, 2023. The video recording of Transforming Your Taste Buds: How to Make Whole Grains the Food You Crave can be viewed for CPEU credit until May 7, 2023. 

These activities should be logged as a 175 activity (Recorded Pre-Approved CPEU). To receive your certificate of completion, please email Kelly@oldwayspt.org to let her know which webinar recording you watched, and any feedback you may have. We welcome your feedback to continually improve the activities/materials offered. RDs may also submit evaluations of the quality of materials to CDR.

 

Sourdough Bootcamp: How (and Why) to Create a Whole Grain Sourdough Starter… and What to Do with It
Erin McKenney, PhD, Teaching Faculty and Academic Coordinator for the department of Applied Ecology, North Carolina State University
View PDF of slides (3.2 MB) / View Video (1 hour)

Whether you’ve been impacted by the shortage of yeast, or you find yourself spending more time at home and are interested in taking on some baking experiments, there has never been a better time to give sourdough baking a try. Did you know that sourdough starters fed different types of flour (whole wheat flour, einkorn flour, rye flour, buckwheat flour, etc.) can have different aromas, bacterial communities, and baking capabilities? In this presentation, we take a deep dive into the nutritional and microbial benefits of sourdough fermentation with a special focus on whole grains. We’ll finish by offering a sneak peek at some of our favorite whole grain sourdough recipes, and where home bakers and fermentation enthusiasts can learn more about these topics. (Recorded on June 30, 2020)

Transforming Your Taste Buds: How to Make Whole Grains the Food You Crave
Dr. Keith Williams, Director, Feeding Program, Penn State Hershey Medical Center
View PDF of slides (409 KB) / View Video (1 hour)

Contrary to popular belief, our food preferences are not set in stone. They can evolve over time, in response to social and cultural cues, as well as exposure to different foods and flavors. In this webinar, we’ll share evidence-based techniques for making picky eaters a thing of the past, with a focus on how to apply these lessons to increase whole grain consumption across all age groups. (Recorded on May 8, 2020)

Wheat Sensitivities: Sorting Fact from Fiction
Dr. Lisa Kissing Kucek, Plant Research Geneticist, USDA-ARS
View PDF of slides (5.5 MB) / View Video (52 minutes)

Some books and celebrities blame “modern wheat” for the perceived rise in gluten-related and wheat-related disorders, and yet research shows that this relationship is more complex than it may seem. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the differences between ancient, heritage and modern wheats and how they may impact immunoreactive compounds. This session will also explore which processing methods show promise with regards to wheat sensitivities and provide tips for producing healthy whole grain foods that people of all backgrounds and health concerns can enjoy. (Recorded on April 15, 2020)