Rating
3.666665
Average: 3.7 (3 votes)
Prep time
5 minutes
Total time
40 minutes
Yield
2 servings
Nutritioni
Ingredients

½ cup millet

2 ½ cups water

4 ounces sliced cauliflower stems and florets (about 1 ½ cups)

½ tsp salt

Optional: butter, roasted garlic, wasabi, horseradish and/or sour cream to taste

Instructions
  1. Wash and drain the millet, then put it in a saucepan with a lid. Add the water, cauliflower, and salt.
  2. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to the lowest simmer. Cover and cook for 35 minutes, checking and giving it a stir after 30 minutes. The millet will break open and thicken the liquid in the pot. When the millet is very soft and thick, take it off the heat and let stand for 5 minutes.
  3. Use a blender for the smoothest puree, but a food processor will work almost as well. Purée until the mixture is as smooth as you can get it.
  4. Add butter or other flavorings, if desired, and serve as a side dish.
     

Recipe courtesy of Robin Asbell, from her book, “The New Whole Grains Cookbook.”

How'd it Taste?

Annoyed
1
WAY TO MUCH LIQUID, DON'T NOT FOLLOW THIS RECIPE
kellytoups
0
Hi Annoyed, How much liquid worked best for you? Our tasters found that 2 1/2 cups was spot on, but if you don't cook it quite long enough, or use a smaller amount of cauliflower, you may need less.
Marcia
5
Delicious. No one guessed what it was. Measurements are spot on! Even doubled works perfectly. Freezes beautifully. Definitely a keeper. Fabulous with sautéed mushrooms and onions!
kellytoups
0
Hi Marcia, I am so glad this recipe was a hit! It is one of our favorites as well. So hearty and comforting!
Lynn
0
Can you use another grain like rye?
Cynthia
0
One reason the millet contributes such a creamy comfort-food taste in this recipe is because the millet breaks open and thickens the liquid in the pot, as described in the recipe. Different grains have different starch contents, and so will behave differently. If you try a different grain, you'll want to cook it in more water than usual, and for longer than usual. I'm not sure rye would work -- and it takes a long time to cook. You might consider sorghum, however. If you use another grain, come back and tell us how it works!
Sandy
5
Overjoyed to find a practical recipe for Millet, which I think is a grain of the Sorghum plant - which is NOW growing wild in South Sudan. This mash & the beautiful taste will bless the starving people, nourish them. Was ecstatic to find it, can't wait to try it and send with my brother on his next trip at the end of the month! Thank you!
csluyter
0
Hi Sandy, We're so glad you liked it! Though millet and sorghum are different grains, either one would work well in this recipe. It's wonderful to hear that sorghum is growing wild in South Sudan -- best wishes to your brother on his trip.

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