Wheat

Strategies to Improve Sensory Qualities of Whole Wheat Asian Noodles

Noodles are a staple of Asian diets, yet many noodles on the market today are made with refined wheat flour, rather than whole grain flour. In this review, scientists share the best practices in making whole wheat Asian noodles (fresh, dried, and instant), and share where more research is needed. With the right techniques, replacing up to 20-72% of the refined white flour with whole wheat flour in Asian noodles can yield a high quality, more healthful product. Products with even higher quantities of whole grain can have even greater health impacts, although their quality may not be directly comparable. Selecting the right wheat variety for the recipe (such as a white whole wheat), milling to a finer particle size, adding complementary ingredients (such as tapioca or soy flour), or using ultrasound treatments to prolong shelf life, are all strategies that can be used to improve whole wheat Asian noodles.
Cereal Chemistry. 2018 Aug 23. doi: 10.1002/cche.10095 (Niu M et al.)

Taste / Palatability

Switching to Whole Grains Can Reduce Abdominal Fat

Visceral fat is a dangerous type of abdominal fat that can surround vital organs like the liver. To see if grain choices might play a role in this fat distribution, researchers randomly assigned 50 Japanese men with a BMI of 23 or greater (midway through the “healthy weight” range or heavier) to a diet with whole grain bread or white bread for 12 weeks, and had their visceral fat estimated using tomography scans. After the 12-week study, the whole grain group lost 4 cm of visceral fat around their middle, while the white bread group showed no significant changes.
Plant Foods and Human Nutrition. 2018 Apr 18. [Epub ahead of print.] (Kikuchi Y et al.)

Abdominal / Visceral Fat
Diet 
Traditional Diets, General

Oat Noodles (Instead of Refined Noodles) Can Help Reduce Cholesterol, Blood Pressure

Refined wheat and rice noodles are common staple foods throughout Asia today, so replacing some of these foods with whole grain versions could go a long way in improving health. To test the impact, researchers randomly assigned 84 healthy adults (some with mildly high cholesterol) in Taiwan to an oat noodle group or a refined wheat noodle group, providing them with 100 grams (about 1 ½ cups cooked) of their respective noodles across 1 or 2 meals each day for 10 weeks. After the 10-week study, the oat group reduced their total cholesterol by 17% and LDL-c (“bad”) cholesterol by 19% compared with the wheat noodle group. The oat noodle group also significantly lowered their blood pressure by 7-11%, but the wheat noodle group did not. The benefits tended to be stronger in people who started the study with slightly high cholesterol, but the results were still statistically significant for the group as a whole.
Journal of Food and Drug Analysis. 2018 April. [Epub ahead of print.] (Liao MY et al.)

Blood Pressure / Hypertension
Cholesterol / Serum Lipids

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